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Looking for a Advice for my Truck

  
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Looking for a Advice for my Truck

 
Strout Strout
New User | Posts: 2 | Joined: 04/13
Posted: 04/08/13
04:31 AM

I am pretty much mechanically inept when it comes to cars, I can do the easy things, starters, alternators, shocks that sort of thing, this fact doesn't stop me from wanting a nice vehicle to have as a daily driver though. I recently purchased a 1983 C 10 Scottsdale truck, single exaust, it has a 305 motor that I was told has been recently rebuilt, I have my doubts about this though, it does burn a bit of oil, other than that the truck seems in pretty good shape, transmission seems to be alright, shifts gears like it should, and the motor does run alright. Like I said I will be using this as a daily driver while I am paying someone to do most of the work that gets done on this truck, engine and body work, this won't be a body off the frame restoration, I know that would be best, but it is what it is. I have been told, by a friend that is just a bit better of a mechanic than I am, that the best way to go about this is to replace the motor with a 350 create motor. I am not looking for a motor that does 500rpms, just a decent motor, that will sound good while going from point A to point B. I have been told that the 350 motor will fit to the motor mounts that are already on the 305 motor, that the parts off of the 305 can be put onto the 350 motor. That being said, there is nothing on the 305 that I would want to save, I would want to start fresh, all new parts. In my town we have the usual array of auto part store's, Napa, Auto Zone and a few others. So my question, should I buy a create motor from one of these stores or go another route, should I keep the transmission that is on the truck, have it rebuilt, if so should I have anything special done to it so that it will accommodate the 350 motor, what about the rear end on the truck, should I be looking to do something with this to accommodate the 350 motor. I know this is a lot to ask, but ya'lls advice will be put to good use.  

zman123 zman123
Enthusiast | Posts: 531 | Joined: 06/08
Posted: 04/08/13
06:11 AM

First, the 305 and 350 are identical in size so there is no problem at all in    changing engines. I think what you were told is true as far as mounts, brackets, alternator, starter etc. so you won't have to go buy new ones. The transmission will fit and handle the increased power of a 350 IF it is in good condition, it would benefit you to have it checked out in advance of a change. The rear end will also work,with a 350 (you might want to have it checked out too and find out what gear ratio is in it) A crate motor from a rebuilder is a good way to go or a short block to add whatever performance parts you want to put on. Most machine shops will assemble an engine for you and put on whatever parts you want to order for no extra cost (plus the cost for the parts). A good plan would include asking around about GOOD machine shops or problems with specific shops (all are not equal)  

68scott385 68scott385
Guru | Posts: 1990 | Joined: 10/09
Posted: 04/08/13
10:05 AM

When researching places to do the work on your truck, find out if they have performance experience. There is a huge difference between rebuilding/replacing parts and rebuilding for performance. Most of your national chain repair shops and transmission shops concentrate on repairs to return the car/unit/parts to stock condition. You want someone that knows how to make performance repairs and modifications without guessing, someone that knows how to do quality work that will render a reliable vehicle.

Since you say you have limited mechanical knowledge, a crate motor or custom build from a reputable machine shop sounds to me like the road for you to take. When looking at crate motors, determine if the motor is new, such a GMPP offering, or if it is remanufactured, like something from Jasper. Some engine remanufacturers put a hodgepodge of parts together in an attempt to keep costs down. Most remaned motors are designed to be stock replacements, not necessarily the basis for a performance application.

If you keep the hp/tq to 450 or less, the rearend should live fine. You may want to consider having a posi unit installed. Gear ratio selection will depend on use, tire size, transmission, and even engine operating range. It never hurts to have the complete rearend inspected anyway. You never know if the axles are starting to gall or if it's had a bearing go bad and an axle saver has been installed. The ring & pinion could have some damage that isn't readily apparent, yet.

And the most important thing to keep in mind is that cheap isn't always the answer. Relibility costs more than a quick fix that will have to addressed later.  
68scott385 68scott385 68scott385

redneckjoe69 redneckjoe69
Addict | Posts: 2337 | Joined: 03/10
Posted: 04/08/13
03:12 PM

i would suggest whoever you narrow it down for a rebuilt engine,... call them anonymously to try and make a claim about a problem.   if they ignore you,...thats the future service you can expect.   it might sound silly, but its about the same thing with insurance.   when you make a claim, are you on hold for hours?  no reply?  etc.?   thats the companys i avoid.   not many people stand behind rebuilt engines.  a bunch of fake warranties.   must have an A.S.E.  mechanic install it?    just some things to think about.   do some research before you buy.  
  another option might be to see what the local machine shop has laying around?   sometimes people drop stuff off and never pay the bill.  you might be able to pick up a nice engine just for the cost of machine work?   thats where id call first.  

Strout Strout
New User | Posts: 2 | Joined: 04/13
Posted: 04/08/13
04:37 PM

Thanks for the advice Smile Now I know the right questions to ask.