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1969 camaro paint trouble

  
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1969 camaro paint trouble

 
rs383450hp rs383450hp
New User | Posts: 17 | Joined: 03/13
Posted: 04/25/13
05:16 PM

Last year i painted my 69 camaro with acrilic enamel and it turned out terrible,it had little pinhead shiny dots all over it,you can only see it if you look at it at an angle,i tried to wet sand it out and hit primer and shot it again,samething happened.I had plastic all around the car and the overspray got everywhere,just about everything(tools,compresser,battery charger,carpet inside of car) is yellow including my other camaro.Could the paint not of been mixed right from the parts store.Do i have to reprime the car again.I painted my mustang 5yrs ago and it turned out really nice no trouble.Any ideas  

idrivejunk idrivejunk
Addict | Posts: 5117 | Joined: 12/09
Posted: 04/26/13
04:46 AM

A pic would help greatly. Mixed acrylic enamel is only good for about a year, tops. When the color is mixed, a "drier" is added. That attacks the inside of the can and ruins the mix after awhile. Improper color mixing would have nothing to do with that. Is your paint fresh? Stores rarely sell acrylic enamel these days so the product you shot could have been too old before you even bought it. From the description I can't imagine the defect but it kinda sounds like the paint is the problem. Did you use any additives other than reducer? Hardener starts to go bad only days after you open the can no matter how well its sealed. It reacts with the air in the can. Usually makes little grains in the paint when its going bad.  
idrivejunk

rs383450hp rs383450hp
New User | Posts: 17 | Joined: 03/13
Posted: 04/27/13
05:30 AM

The paint was only a day old and the little dots looks like bondo that was not sanded good enough but its not bondo because its everywhere and theres no bondo where the dots are  

idrivejunk idrivejunk
Addict | Posts: 5117 | Joined: 12/09
Posted: 04/27/13
07:05 AM

So the paint you used a year ago was a different mix and did the same thing?

I'll repeat the other important question since you skipped it. Were any additives used? The verbal description isn't working, I still can't imagine what you are seeing. I am trained to recognize paint defects by looking at them.

Bondo that hasn't been sanded enough but has been sanded some would just look wavy, in my imagination. Sandscratches, pinholes, and staining are the only defects filler would create but since theres not any, the closest thing I can think of is cratering or fisheyes. If the older paint was contaminated, it would cause the same problem on a respray that wasn't primed first.

Is this a singe stage paint job or is it clearcoated? What kind of paint did you use? Was it the same kind both times? What kind of container and paddle did you use to stir in the reducer? What environment, humidity, and temperature are you spraying in? How was the panel cleaned before the first paint application, and what did you paint over then?  
idrivejunk

idrivejunk idrivejunk
Addict | Posts: 5117 | Joined: 12/09
Posted: 04/27/13
09:32 AM

One more idea is "solvent pop". The spray area you described sounds like there is little if any air movement and a lot of potential contaminants. As paint dries, a cloud of solvent vapor surrounds the car. If there is not enough airflow to carry those fumes away, the solvent in the paint has a hard time getting out because the air around it is already saturated with solvent vapors. So the paint film can "skin over" and trap solvent inside. When warm fresh air and sunshine first hit the paint job, that trapped solvent escapes any way it can. You can smell it. Usually makes little "popped bubble" type pits in the finish that are like bondo pinholes but smaller around and not as deep. They usually fill up with buffing sludge and look like tiny white dots. Sand and repaint to fix those.

Do you use your spray gun for any other materials besides auto paint? What do you clean it with? Is the compressed air filtered?  
idrivejunk

rs383450hp rs383450hp
New User | Posts: 17 | Joined: 03/13
Posted: 04/28/13
09:03 AM

ok all this happened last year and both times the paint was mixed the same way.The paint was mixed in a plastic container and stired with a wooden pattle that the shop gave me. There was no fish eyes and the pin holes that iam talking about is not holes but sounds more like cratering and when i wet sanded the paint it dulled like it should except for the pin holes they stayed shiny.I painted the car with 3 coats so i can wet sand it to make it smooth.Then buff to polish.I tried to buff over it after wet sanding it but the spots was shiner and could only be seen if you look at it on an angle with a light.The paint was mixed with a ruducer(medium JR506 or fast JR505)not sure which one,one might of been for the primer and a Hi-Gloss enamel hardener(JH6002)and the paint was a acrylic enamel(JE).The primer was acrylic sealer(JP315).Both times I primed first with a sealer.There was no clear coat.All of the brands was Shop-Line.I had plastic all around the car that went up to the rafters.There was just a little space between the rafters for the paint to escape and no exhaust fan.The paint gun was brand new(gravity feed)and cleaned with a thinner and the compresser had a filter and a regulator on it.So you are saying when i repaint i dont need a sealer but just paint with the additives.The car has not been outside yet.It was all painted in pieces.With everything off the floor.The car was cleaned with a thinner and tack cloth from the paint shop.  

rs383450hp rs383450hp
New User | Posts: 17 | Joined: 03/13
Posted: 04/28/13
09:35 AM

Ok i thought i hit the wrong button so i rewrote all this on paper so i can retype it again.I dont have to sand the paint complety off just use the same paint and additives and no sealer  

idrivejunk idrivejunk
Addict | Posts: 5117 | Joined: 12/09
Posted: 04/28/13
02:18 PM

Hmm- unfortunately it does sound like something you'll need to sand off to get rid of. Sealer may not hold it down. I haven't used the ShopLine stuff.

What I was saying about additives was to find out if you used hardener in it. And you did. Which is good! But I suspect two things mostly after your description. A bad product or a contaminated surface. Neither one is OK to prime and paint over again. Try again on something that has never been near the garage. Ask the paint store to check for recalls on the batch # of the paint products you have (its on the bottom of the can) and see if any of it is too old per the shelf life listed on the tech data sheet. Take one of your small parts to the paint store and show it to them, ask for input. See if anybody else using that paint has had problems.

It really sounds most like something was on it when you shot it the first time, and its gonna haunt you until its gone if thats the case. Fisheyes and cratering are pretty much the same, and I've had that happen just from sweating on the surface. Guessing what caused it at this point is pointless because you have to sand it away. At least without seeing it myself, I have to say it sounds like sand off and repaint is the permanent solution. Double check everything, get some air flow in there, and be sure to be thorough with the solvent cleaning prior to spraying, being sure to allow time for it all to evaporate. Unfortunately, any moisture or oil in the air line gets past a good cleaning so it can still burn ya and cause stuff like this.

You could also try clearcoating one of your parts, and see if that comes out OK. If it did, maybe you could just scuff and clear it all.  
idrivejunk

rs383450hp rs383450hp
New User | Posts: 17 | Joined: 03/13
Posted: 04/28/13
07:21 PM

Ok i will try to repaint in a couple of weeks,need to save some money up and i will take your advice and see the parts store.I might try a clearcoat on it too.Thanks for the help.  

idrivejunk idrivejunk
Addict | Posts: 5117 | Joined: 12/09
Posted: 04/29/13
04:42 AM

No sweat, you're welcome. Sucks how when paint work doesn't turn out right, you gotta start all over like that. Better to have it happen on your own project than when you are doing somebody else's car. I bet you'll find help at the paint store if you can show them the problem. If nobody there really seems to know what they are doing, ask for the name / number of the paint sales / tech person for that brand. Its in their best interest to help folks solve problems like this, and they will be aware of any recent product defects or conflicts that might cause the trouble you've had.

Good luck!  
idrivejunk

rs383450hp rs383450hp
New User | Posts: 17 | Joined: 03/13
Posted: 06/08/13
07:50 AM

i looked on the internet for dupont paint and it had a list of paint troubles and the trouble i had was called pinholing,it looked just like bondo that was not sanded smooth.I still dont have the money to repaint it yet.  

Pontiacman2 Pontiacman2
Moderator | Posts: 8956 | Joined: 09/08
Posted: 06/08/13
02:24 PM

Pin holing is usually caused by trapped solvents, air or moisture or improper surface preparation.  
Pontiacman2
Pontiacman2

Professional Hi-performance engine builder

idrivejunk idrivejunk
Addict | Posts: 5117 | Joined: 12/09
Posted: 06/10/13
04:55 PM

Well that sucks, especially if the pinholes are actually in the bondo. If you have good lighting and do a close visual inspection during pre-paint cleaning, you'll usually find those especially when you blow it off real good. If the actual paint film is pinholed its probably due to something like Pman said. In your case, I'd blame inadequate ventilation resulting in solvent pop due to the lack of air flow and poor drying. Either way, its a repaint. Don't let a little roughness stop you from having fun with the car in the meantime.  
idrivejunk

rs383450hp rs383450hp
New User | Posts: 17 | Joined: 03/13
Posted: 06/10/13
06:52 PM

I cant have no fun with it because its all in pieces,everything but the doors are off the car to be painted but i was wondering if i could just sand it smooth and repaint or do i have to reprime the car before i paint it again  

idrivejunk idrivejunk
Addict | Posts: 5117 | Joined: 12/09
Posted: 06/10/13
08:06 PM

Well, you could go ahead and sand out a spot and see how far down it goes. Then you would know. Chances are you'll need to prime it again, unless they sand out real easy. If you break thru the color before its all gone, you will need to prime again and maybe even need some glaze putty first where its bad. If when you sand a test spot, you find that the color doesn't featheredge well with the sandpaper, that means it didn't dry right and isn't stuck good. You would have to knock all that off in order to make it trustworthy for more paint.

Try sanding a spot, then holler back. See if it goes away before the paint is gone. See if it sands out well and has dried hard and stuck. If both those answers are yes, there may be hope but you have some risk of it re-occurring if you don't prime or at least seal it. Maybe go ahead and spray something over a spot you've sanded out and see how it acts.

That bites, having the project hung up like that, I couldn't stand it!  
idrivejunk

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